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dc.contributor.author Delhey, Kaspar
dc.coverage.spatial Australia
dc.coverage.temporal Holocene
dc.date.accessioned 2017-06-22T15:10:22Z
dc.date.available 2017-06-22T15:10:22Z
dc.date.issued 2017-06-05
dc.identifier doi:10.5061/dryad.n7832
dc.identifier.citation Delhey K (2017) Darker where cold and wet: Australian birds follow their own version of Gloger's rule. Ecography, online in advance of print.
dc.identifier.issn 0906-7590
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10255/dryad.149790
dc.description Gloger's rule is usually interpreted as predicting darker coloured animals in warmer and more humid/vegetated regions. The relative importance of temperature and rainfall or vegetation is however unclear, and often only one variable is tested at a time, mainly through proxies. Here, I assess the predictions of Gloger's rule for interspecific achromatic plumage variation (dark to light variation) for an entire avifauna (551 species of Australian landbirds). I tested the effects of climatic variables (temperature and rainfall) and vegetation structure on plumage reflectance at species and assemblage level (100x100 km cells), controlling for phylogenetic relatedness and spatial autocorrelation. To assess the robustness of these results I compared observed results with those of a null distribution of effects obtained from repeatedly simulating random plumage reflectance evolution on the phylogeny. At both the species and assemblage level, darker coloured birds were found in wetter and colder regions and in more densely vegetated habitats. Simulations confirm results at the species level and the effect of temperature at the assemblage level, but rainfall and vegetation effects at the assemblage level fall within the distribution of simulated effects and should be interpreted with care. Interspecific colour variation in Australian birds supports Gloger's rule for rainfall/vegetation, but shows the opposite pattern for temperature. Darker colours in wet and vegetated environments are consistent with the role of melanin pigmentation in preventing feather degradation by bacteria, but also with background-matching for camouflage. Darker plumage might be beneficial in colder regions or detrimental in warmer regions if it affects thermoregulation, a selective force often only assumed to be of importance for ectotherms. The data highlight the need to test the generality of biogeographic rules across levels and at broad scale. Experimental work is needed to confirm the mechanisms linking plumage achromatic variation to climate.
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.n7832/1
dc.relation.haspart doi:10.5061/dryad.n7832/2
dc.relation.isreferencedby doi:10.1111/ecog.03040
dc.subject achromatic
dc.subject colour
dc.subject melanin
dc.subject plumage
dc.subject climate
dc.subject thermoregulation
dc.subject water
dc.subject temperature
dc.title Data from: Darker where cold and wet: Australian birds follow their own version of Gloger's rule
dc.type Article
dwc.ScientificName Aves
dc.contributor.correspondingAuthor Delhey, Kaspar
prism.publicationName Ecography

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Title Data for species-level analyses
Downloaded 1 time
Description Data includes the following variables: phylo.name=scientific names which match nomenclature used in birdtree.org; patch.loc= dorsal (d) or ventral (v); log10av.ref=log10-transformed average reflectance of dorsal or verntral plumage patches; hab.close=index of vegetation density; temp=average temperature based on the distribution of the species; log10rain=average log10-transformed annual rainfall based on the distribution of the species; lat=average latitude based on the distribution of the species; lon=average longitude based on the distribution of the species; sex=male or female.
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Title Data for the assemblage-level analyses
Downloaded 1 time
Description Data has the following variables: cell.name=identifier for each 1 degree cell; n.species=number of species recorded in cell; av.ref.m.d= average male dorsal reflectance value for species recorded in cell; av.ref.m.v=average male ventral reflectance value for species recorded in cell; av.ref.f.d=average female dorsal reflectance value for species recorded in cell; av.ref.f.v=average female ventral reflectance value for species recorded in cell; Lat=latitude of centre of cell; Lon=longitude of centre of cell; n.surveys=number of surveys carried out in cell; temp=average temperature in a 50 km radius around the centre of cell; log10rain=log10-transformed average annual rainfall in a 50 km radius around the centre ; veg=average vegetation structure score in a 50 km radius around the centre of cell.
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